Best Boston Parks for a Winter Wonderland Walk
Posted on: January 12, 2018

Photo by andrewjsan

While the weather outside may be frightful, the winter in Boston offers views and scenery you won’t find anywhere else. While the historic city is a blend of sophisticated architecture, museums, five-star restaurants, and some of the best shopping on the East Coast, just a few miles away are majestic landscapes filled with beautiful woodland scenery, wildlife, and picturesque streams and ponds. Once you leave the city, even just a few miles away from the hustle and bustle, and visit some of the beautiful local parks, you’ll feel like you’re in another world.

While all of the parks are stunning year-round, with blooming flowers in the spring and brilliantly colored foliage in the fall, winter offers a completely different experience. Noanet Woodlands, located on Powisset Street in Dover, is about 15 miles outside of the city. This 600-acre park features 17 miles of walking trails, making it the ideal spot for those who love winter sports such as snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. Noanet Woodlands is the perfect spot for an afternoon filled with adventure.

In Lincoln, Mass about 20 minutes west of the city, you’ll find the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, which offers the best of both worlds: nature and contemporary art. The 30-acre park, located at 51 Sandy Pond Road, just 20 miles from the city, hosts 90-minute snowshoe tours and includes more than 60 contemporary art sculptures, making it one of the more unique spots on our list.

Rocky Woods, located in Medfield, 27 miles southeast of Boston, boasts nearly 500 acres of woodlands, including frozen streams, brooks, and ponds during the winter months. The park features 6.5 miles of trails, including a 2.3-mile walking loop and a 435-foot hike to the top of Cedar Hill. You’ll enjoy the varied terrain and the stunning vistas as you explore this park filled with nature’s treasures.

 

World’s End, a 250-acre coastscape located 15 miles south of Boston, was designed by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead and boasts dazzling views of the city’s skyline. With tree-lined walking paths that circle saltwater marshes, this park juts out into Hingham Harbor, offering sensational walking trails along the coast. While the harbor rarely freezes during the cold winter months, you can still catch a glimpse of frozen ice chunks as they move through the water. Voted the top attraction in Hingham, this park is a favorite of residents and tourists alike.

Douglas State Forest, a nearly 6,000-acre park that borders Connecticut and Rhode Island, is located about an hour southwest of the city. The highlight of the park is the pond that straddles Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and is the perfect spot for ice fishing during the cold months. If you’re interested in snowshoeing or cross-country skiing, this winter paradise boasts miles of impressive trails, including a boardwalk trail that opens up to the 5-acres Atlantic White Cedar swampland, a rare gem that was named an official Massachusetts Wildland.

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